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We are working to have the website conform to the relevant standards of the Section 508 Web Accessibility Standards developed by the United States Access Board, as well as the World Wide Web Consortium's (W3C) Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.1. These standards and guidelines explain how to make web content more accessible for people with disabilities. We believe that conformance with these standards and guidelines will help make the website more user friendly for all people.

Our efforts are ongoing. While we strive to have the website adhere to these guidelines and standards, it is not always possible to do so in all areas of the website. If, at any time, you have specific questions or concerns about the accessibility of any particular webpage, please contact WebsiteAccess@tenethealth.com so that we may be of assistance.

Thank you. We hope you enjoy using our website.

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Nuclear Medicine

Nuclear medicine involves the use of small amounts of radioactive materials (or tracers) to help diagnose and treat a variety of diseases. Nuclear medicine determines the cause of the medical problem based on the function of the organ, tissue or bone.

Millions of nuclear medicine tests are performed each year in the United States alone. Nuclear medicine tests (also known as scans, examinations, or procedures) are safe and painless. In a nuclear medicine test, the radioactive material is introduced into the body by injection or swallowing. Generally, nuclear medicine tests are not recommended for pregnant women because unborn babies have a greater sensitivity to radiation than children or adults.

If you are pregnant or think that you may be pregnant, your doctor may order a different type of diagnostic test.

Special guidelines may apply for studies that involve radiopharmaceutical administration:

If you are pregnant, or think you are, tell your doctor because radioiodine should not be given during pregnancy. If you are planning to become pregnant, ask your doctor how long you should wait after the treatment.

If you have been breastfeeding your baby, you must stop because radioiodine is secreted in breast milk. Talk to your doctor to find out when you can resume breastfeeding.

Prior to your visit

  • Our staff will contact you prior to your scheduled appointment date to confirm your upcoming visit. To make your visit as quick as possible, we will make every effort to pre-register you for your visit.
  • Our staff will advise you of any special preparations that may be required for your exam.

On the day of your visit

  • Please bring a photo ID, your insurance information and the prescription from your physician to your appointment.
  • Wear comfortable clothing.

Following your visit

  • Our radiologists will interpret your images and send a report directly to your doctor.  Your doctor will communicate the results of your exam to you.

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